Creative Furniture Refinishing and Fiber Arts
Please come in and have a look around. Thank you for stopping by!

Ceramic Tile Painting

I did some entertaining in the month of March, but all is quiet at the home front and I can’t wait for the upcoming yard and tag sales!

My sister was visiting me and we had a wonderful time together.  There were plenty coffee breaks and I cooked and fussed over her.   By the way, she is very creative .  She did a lot of sewing throughout the years, and embroidery, and home decorating and home improving etc etc.  the list goes on and on.  A few years ago she started making and hand painting ceramic tiles.   She uses old Dutch tile examples (like the Delft blue tiles) and paints them meticulously.    I asked her to do a tutorial about ceramic tile painting.

Tutorial  Ceramic Tile Painting

I give the microphone to my sister now…

“The following is one of several techniques used on painting tiles.  More about that later. In my first tutorial of Ceramic Tile Making I explained about how to make a tile and we left off with a clean dry tile (greenware) and now it is time to decorate the tile.    Start with using a pattern, adjust to size if needed.  To make things easier I usually cut the pattern to the size of my tile, in this case 4″ x 4”.

tilemaking1-1_zpsb45a0c90[1]

 

Hetty and I were born and raised  in the Netherlands so old Dutch patterns are always my favorite.  Next trace the pattern with a pencil on a piece of white tissue paper.

6d50a8f3-1573-4979-a70e-fde3c7babd18_zps4bd7e94c[1]

 

Again, cut the paper to size.  Place the tissue on your tile and trace with a black sharpie.

dfcddea3-d2b8-4b77-845a-42798d4d0d36_zpsc0ff68e1[1]

 

The tulip image transfers beautifully and the ink will fire off in the kiln.  After the outlining you go ahead with the coloring.  Pick the colors you like to use.  I use the Duncan Easy Strokes for this project.  Only use a few drops at the time, the paint dries quickly (tip: turn off the ceiling fan too!).  The last step is to outline the entire image with a color of your choice.  I choose blue.

de70e262-1d32-4a28-a537-3e45a677e2d0_zps9726866e[1]

Next you have to place the tiles in the kiln, place them directly on the shelf.  Fire at cone 06.

d9c16923-17ff-45f0-992a-7c49aa24abf8_zps57703f74[1]

 

After the bisque firing the tiles look nice and crisp.   The next step is glazing.  Coat the tiles three times, making sure they are completely dry in between coats.  I use Envision clear glaze 1001 and I use a fan brush.  The fan brush is soft-grip SG850 from Royal.

6e1dc06c-ed16-4750-bbc0-67b897f59b3f_zpsc704b5cf[1]

The tiles are glaze fired at cone 05.  This time they will have to rest on stilts in the kiln to prevent “sticking” to the shelves.

c3a92668-5b21-4107-95c6-6d62d5eebd2c_zpsb614f735[1]

And here is the end result:

c8a4925e-d2d8-472f-bf98-8484f854e2a7_zpsa0b0a829[1]

 

I use this particular ceramic tile tableau in my own kitchen:

panel2_zpse8210f99[1]

 

panelkitchen1_zps2c312c8e[1]

 

Thanks Hanneke for this great tutorial!

 

Link parties:

http://thebusybhive.blogspot.com/

http://www.momontimeout.com/

http://www.stonegableblog.com/

http://www.redouxinteriors.com/

http://whipperberry.com

http://www.504main.com

http://what-about.co/

 

 

 

 

4 Comments
  1. What a fun and easy idea to spruce up a kitchen! Thanks for sharing at Pinworthy Projects.

  2. Hello, I’m really interested in trying this. I, however, know nothing about it other than what I just read. Question: I understand about making the green ware. At what point and how did the background, overall tile become white? By the way I have a kiln in my basement that came with the house.

    Thanks, Lora

    • Dear Lora:
      Thanks for your questions, my sister is actually the accomplished ceramic tile maker and painter in the family. I will forward your email to her if you don’t mind.

Leave a Reply